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Dr. Douglas Kappstatter

 

Contact Information

Douglas Kappstatter, DVM
144 7th Street
Bethpage, New York 11714

Phone: (516) 932-3089

douglask@i-2000.com


About Dr. Kappstatter

I received an engineering degree from Tufts University in 1968 and worked at that profession until entering veterinary school at Iowa State University in 1976. I graduated from ISU in 1981 and soon developed an interest in alternative medicine. I became certified by IVAS (International Veterinary Acupuncture Society) in 1986 and graduated from Tri-State Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine in 1989. For several years I practiced both human and veterinary acupuncture in New York City. I no longer practice human acupuncture. My first exposure to homeopathy was taking Richard Pitcairnís course the first year it was offered in 1992. Since that time I have taken over 800 hours of courses with some of the leading teachers of homeopathy today. I have taken, and completed, courses with Louis Klein, Paul Herscu, Joel Kreisberg and Jayesh Shah.


Training

BS Engineering; Tufts University; 1968
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, 1981
Tri-State Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1989
Completed Richard Pitcairnís course in veterinary homeopathy, 1993
Completed Paul Herscuís course in homeopathy, 1996
Completed Louis Kleinís course in homeopathy, 1999
Completed Jayesh Shahís course in homeopathy, June 2000


About Our Practice

My practice is limited to telephone consultations and limited house calls locally. When a person contacts me to treat their pet with homeopathy I provide a free five or ten minute consultation to see if the animal is a promising candidate. If I donít think that homeopathy holds out much promise of a cure I will not take the case. We can then discuss other options.

I charge $100 per hour for telephone consultations. This one hour is the time that I set aside for taking a new case. The fee of $100 does not include the cost of the remedy or remedies that I will send you or the cost of shipping those remedies. This fee is paid over the phone by credit card. If I ask you to call me back in a week or ten days to tell me if there have been changes in the case, there is no fee for this conversation.

Follow-up consultations are usually scheduled for three weeks for the initial intake in cases of chronic disease. Fifteen minutes are set aside for this appointment and I charge $30 for this consultation. If new symptoms have come up and a new analysis is necessary and the fifteen minutes is not enough time either the time is extended then, or another appointment is made.


Practice philosophy

The foundation of my practice philosophy is that the more vitality an animal possesses the better the animal will respond to all therapeutic modalities. Animals fed a raw food diet will enjoy maximum vitality. In the early part of the 20th century Francis Pottenger, MD studied the effect of raw vs cooked diet on 900 cats. Dr. Pottenger found that cats fed a heat-processed diet over time developed many of the problems that have reached epidemic proportions today; allergies, skin problems, behavioral problems, dental and skeletal problems and numerous endocrine problems.

Other suggestions to maximize pet vitality and longevity are:

1. Lean Body condition; Studies in humans clearly indicate that when the body weight of an individual is 20% or more above what it should be, longevity begins to decline. How many 80 year old people have you ever met who weigh 300 pounds? The same principle applies to your pet.

2. Fresh Air and Natural Sunlight; Natural sunlight directly penetrates our bodies and performs various critical functions--including acting on the neuro-endocrine system. It activates Vitamin D which is necessary to absorb calcium. The part of the sunlight that performs these tasks is filtered out by glass. Controlled studies show that animals deprived of fresh air and natural sunlight develop both physical and emotional problems at a higher rate than animals not deprived in this way.

3. Regular exercise; Did you know that on the average, a pack of wolves in the wild travels 50 miles each day? I am not suggesting that you run two marathons a day with your dog. Regular exercise and / or play is, however, essential for optimum health and longevity. Not only are exercise and play essential for muscle tone and mental well-being, they are also wonderful ways to promote bonding.

4. Vaccinations; Have you ever wondered why humans are vaccinated for diseases like pertussis once per lifetime, but pets are supposed to be vaccinated every year? The answer is because the manufacturers of vaccines think itís a swell idea. Not only is it an unnecessary expense, but numerous studies have shown that the incidence of essentially all immune-mediated disease is much higher among animals who are vaccinated yearly. The America Association of Feline Practitioners now recommends vaccinating cats every three years. I think that even this is excessive. Test you pet to see if itís immunity to a specific disease is adequate. If it is not, vaccinate it for that single disease.

5. Suppression of Symptoms; The MOST deleterious thing you can do to you petís overall well-being is to suppress symptoms. Symptoms are not the disease, they are clues to the true nature of the disease. All suppression does is make symptoms go away and drive disease deeper into the body.

6. Mental Stimulation and Purpose to Life; There is a wonderful word is Sanskrit that describes what Iím talking about. Dharma--which means ďPurpose to LifeĒ-- holds that all living beings have taken manifestation in physical form to perform a purpose. My own little dog-pictured above- is a perfect example. She goes to work with me every day and, no matter where I am working, immediately assumes her role as ďAssistant Office Manager.Ē She patrols the halls, spreads good cheer, and dispels tension with her enthusiasm and love of life. That is her Dharma. The point is that your pet did not evolve over eons of time to be a couch potato. Your pet does not want to be a couch potato. Part of the responsibility of having a pet is to realize the potential of Dharma in a creative way.


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